Flash Fiction #233

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PHOTO PROMPT © Ted Strutz

LESS IS MORE

In some ways, under-population is the bane of the developed world.  When I was a child, I thought that inheriting this house would be marvelous.  Now that it’s happened, I own a white elephant.

When it was built, 150 years ago, the normal 8-10-12 children were needed to maintain it.  Older sons mended the shingles. Middle teens cut the grass and pruned the trees.  Daughters tended flowers and vegetables.  Young Tom Sawyer-types whitewashed the fence.

Medicine improved, and families shrunk.  Now, I don’t have the time, energy or income to keep it presentable.

***

Go to Rochelle’s Addicted to Purple site and use her Wednesday photo as a prompt to write a complete 100 word story.

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29 thoughts on “Flash Fiction #233

  1. Interesting perceptive reply to the prompt, good stuff

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  2. House it going? LOL!(‐^▽^‐)

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  3. James McEwan says:

    Yes, very well told. I am in a similar position. the girls have grown and left home – downsize they say – but I’ve put so much into the place why move?

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  4. Rivergirl says:

    Ah, the good old days… when you just birthed a workforce.
    😉

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Sue says:

    Enjoyed your take on the prompt. When I first saw the photo, it reminded me of my great-grandparents home in South Carolina. Too big as you say but still in the family.

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    • Archon's Den says:

      It’s nice to keep it in the family, but sometimes not affordable, and the best (only) choice is to sell to a dot.com millionaire.
      Might I ask where, specifically, in SC?? We’ve toured two plantations, one south, and one north, of Charleston. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • Sue says:

        It’s a home in Walterboro, SC. It’s one of many on the historic registry on Hampton Street.

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      • Archon's Den says:

        That’s a nice little town, and a lovely old tree-lined street. We never quite reached there, only the flea-market at Ladson, and Middleton Place. Thanx. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Sue says:

        Yes, it was once a nice little town. It’s grown so much over the years. I remember taking a tour of the old plantations years ago, including Middleton Place. Amazing and tragic history of the south. Happy Saturday 😊

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  6. Dora says:

    I wonder how many old large houses we drive past whose upkeep is almost if not wholly beyond what the owners can afford. I hope you find a resolution that you can be happy with.

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  7. I hear you, Archon. Three years ago, having a nice-sized house with a larger than usual lot seemed like a terrific idea. As much as I still love the house and the yard, the work is becoming a bit too much for hubby and me, who, as you know, are not spring chickens any more, either. Now that the kids are grown and out of the house, with busy lives of their own, we can’t really ask them for help. But we also don’t want to go into an apartment somewhere, so we deal with it. I guess once we get to the point where we can’t do the work any more, we’ll just have to hire someone to do it for us. Heck, our much younger neighbors (in their 40s) have a professional lawn service once a week, and they look perfectly healthy and capable, so probably there’d be no shame in us becoming lazy.

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    • Archon's Den says:

      With my increasing age, and T’s increasing need for support, the lawn has just got away from me. Thirty years ago, this place was a corn-field. Broad-leafed weeds have overrun my back lawn. Next year, when the mortgage is (finally) paid off, the only solution I see, is to have someone Roto-Till and re-sod it. 😯

      Liked by 1 person

  8. The house has such charm and style. Have you thought about trying the Bed and Breakfast route for one or two years? Or with your remarkable wealth of knowledge, maybe you could open a little book store or library with a small gift shop too. I don’t know how the rules differ in Canada as opposed to America though.

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    • Archon's Den says:

      It’s a good thing that my actual house is brick, or it might have collapsed from the weight of books. The wife has approx. 1000. I have about 2000, and the son owns about 3000, almost all paperbacks – more than some small book-exchanges.
      A Scottish comedian was invited to a Comedy-Fest in NYC. He chose to stay at a Bed and Breakfast. When he entered his room, there was no bedframe of any sort. The box-spring lay on the floor, with the sheeted mattress on top. He arrived on a Friday evening, and his landlady informed him that she did not serve breakfast on the weekends. 😯 There are only two requirements for a “Bed” and “Breakfast,” and she provided neither of them 😳 😆

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Bill says:

    Oh yes. How everything changes. Well stated.

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  10. msjadeli says:

    Very true, a big house is like a needy family member.

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  11. Yes, yes a big house like that needs all the hands that can help. Good non-fictionalized story.

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