WOW #70

I was recently reading an historical novel.  In it, a commoner performed an uncommon act of intelligence and bravery.  As a reward for this selfless act, the Grand Panjandrum – or Grand Poobah – they both indicate a pretentious or self-important official, like a High Muckedy-Muck, bestowed upon him the reward of a

Carucate
[keyr-oo-kate, (yoo)]

Because I was reading a dead-tree book, I couldn’t just tap the Kindle screen to find out what a carucate was.  I had to play Twenty Questions until I got upstairs to the computer.  Was it a gem – a jewel, like the Blue Carbuncle in the Sherlock Holmes novel?  Was it a lavish dinner in his honor?  Was it a warm, if not willing, bed-companion?  Was it a mani-pedi down at Omar’s Tent and Sail Shop, and Spa?  Don’t ask – don’t tell.   😉 

It turns out that it’s another archaic measurement quantity, equal to 40 acres of land, or a quarter-section – one quarter of a square mile.  It was the amount of land that a team of oxen could plow, and the amount of tilled land that it took to produce enough food for a farm family.

While the measurement is described as square, especially those with water frontage, were a mile long, and a quarter-mile wide, farming spaghetti, or rhubarb.  It was hard to turn an ox-team and unwieldy plow around. It was easier to let the team catch their breath, and just start another furrow in a straight line, for eight furlongs, and this gave more tenants shipping/travel access . Quebec’s Eastern Townships, in Canada are like this, only larger, all fronting on the St. Lawrence River, and looking like a bowling alley on a map. 

Was it possible that this Grand Vizier – Why do all these $3 potentates describe their titles as Grand??! – wanted this potter…. or leather-worker…. to leave the city, and become just another subsistence farmer??  He could sell it, or lease it to a share-cropper.  At least he took his dictionary along, and I learned a new old word.  😀

4 thoughts on “WOW #70

  1. Rivergirl says:

    I always learn something here. Whether I needed to is another issue entirely….
    😉

    Liked by 1 person

  2. 1jaded1 says:

    Thanks for the vocabulary lesson. I might be going to a doctor if I noticed a blue carbuncle. I haven’t read that book as context, though.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Archon's Den says:

      Having once had a boil, I would much prefer to have the gem-stone than the skin infection.
      A carbuncle can be any gem with a rounded top, and a flat bottom, but…. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle either was wrong, or was messing with his readers. A carbuncle – by definition – is red, usually a dark, brownish red. My birthstone is the sapphire, but I’d still take a ruby or garnet with my goose. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

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