Flash Fiction #59

Addiction

PHOTO PROMPT © G.L. MacMillan

WHITE RABBIT

As a little girl, Alice had enjoyed visiting her grandparents. She often spent time in the old storage shed behind their house. Her path to the back was blocked by the swivel frame of a mirror-stand.

When she was 13, she realized she could access the rear simply by stepping through the empty oval. She found a set of shelves with colored bottles and vials. A sign on one said, “Eat me”. Another was labeled, “Drink me.” Others said, “Snort me,” and “Smoke me.” She obeyed them all.

“And that,” she told the rehab psychiatrist, “is how I got addicted.”

***

Go to Rochelle’s Addicted to Purple site and use her Wednesday photo as a prompt to write a complete 100 word story.

#487

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38 thoughts on “Flash Fiction #59

  1. BrainRants says:

    Wow, edgy! I like it.

    Like

  2. aFrankAngle says:

    Good one … and I didn’t expect that ending.

    Like

    • Archon's Den says:

      Even when I go for a surprise ending, I sometimes give a hint/clue in the title – Billy Idol for ‘White Wedding’, White Rabbit for ‘Alice Through the Looking Glass.’ It’s difficult to build suspense with only a hundred words. At least the butler didn’t do it. 😆

      Like

  3. mjlstories says:

    Didn’t expect the turn this was going to take! Or maybe she’s just winding up her rehab psychiatrist?
    I’m just addicted to fiction – read me, read me! Takes you on a journey it’s easier to come back from than chemical journeys.

    Like

    • Archon's Den says:

      It seems obvious that it didn’t happen just the way she relates. Besides your theory, I envisioned 4 or 5 others. Is she hallucinating? Is she still stoned at an intake interview? Is she rationalizing? Were Grandma and Grandpa pill-poppers? It’s another write-your-own ending.
      I once worked with a woman who was buzzed all the time at work. I don’t know why she didn’t hurt herself or someone else. At break time she’d climb up on the roof and smoke up. “Reality is for people who can’t handle drugs.”
      I’m with you about the reading. Each January I publish a list and comments about the books I’ve read the previous year, recently between 30 and 40. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  4. We can add your tale to the endlessly wonderful renditions of this age old story! Nice job.

    Like

    • Archon's Den says:

      Thank you, Dawn. You also did well (again). I remained silent among the multitude of your fans when I visited.
      I have finally realized that your second name is not (Dan) Quayle!? Is it pronounced ‘Kyle’ as my grandson’s second name is? 😕

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Sightsnbytes says:

    great job…gave me a laugh actually

    Like

    • Archon's Den says:

      Not at drug addiction, surely. 😯 Probably at me trying to rewrite real literature.
      Did you read this week’s offering from ‘The Greenwalled Tower’? He wrote a story about Eau de Newfoundland. I haven’t looked up where he currently resides (somewhere in the States, I believe), but he was born up near L’Anse aux Meadows. 😕

      Like

  6. Margaret says:

    Just like that. Someone should have warned Alice to think for herself. Very good story with an interesting twist.

    Like

  7. I always wondered, when reading that particular book, if those “Eat me” and “Drink me” signs didn’t mean something else. Now I know.

    Like

    • Archon's Den says:

      Oh yes. Like Gulliver’s Travels, this book was presented as an innocent children’s’ book, by an author hiding behind a fake name, and was a scathing denunciation of Victorian, upper-crust, drug-raddled society.
      Ladies were given laudanum (opium) for everything. Eat Me – Hash brownies, magic mushrooms. Drink Me – included absinthe, a liquor infused with wormwood, which caused LSD-like hallucinations. Disappearing cats, and a caterpillar smoking a hookah? That wasn’t Turkish tobacco. The drug-culture’s slang for taking downers is ‘getting small’. 😯

      Like

  8. gahlearner says:

    I laughed out loud. You led us there with great skill. The name, the mirror, the bottles. The ending is priceless (and sad for poor Alice, but she found help).

    Like

  9. “Go ask Alice ….when she’s ten feet tall”
    was that Jefferson Starship?

    Like

    • Archon's Den says:

      Wiki says that one was released when they were still Jefferson Airplane. While not as thrilled with the actual song, I love the radio announcer’s voice in the background of ‘We Built This City’. From the Golden Era of AM radio, when DJs like Wolfman Jack, and Chicago’s Cousin Brucey were entertaining celebrities.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. A poignant ending for Alice. Her innocence at age 13 never spelled out the consequences of her curiosity. A well thought out story. I enjoyed it tremendously. GREAT write …!!! 😎

    Like

  11. Dale says:

    Ha ha! Love it… Maybe we’ll keep this version for the older crowd… (Not like the original isn’t weird enough!)

    Like

  12. Ah, you’ve brought Alice up-to-date. This “trip” didn’t turn out as well thought. Well, done, Archon. 🙂 — Suzanne

    Like

  13. Dear Archon,

    A likely story. Well done.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Like

  14. Susan Langer says:

    Alice as a druggie. They’ll tell you anything that takes the responsibity off of them. You made me laugh. 🙂

    Like

    • Archon's Den says:

      I’m glad you got a chuckle out of it. The sad thing is, many of them believe their own stories. It’s no wonder police, fire and ambulance workers quickly become inured. They’ve heard all these lies hundreds of times. Someone telling the truth is an oddity. 😯

      Liked by 1 person

  15. Daniel Digby says:

    Yep. That was exactly how it happened.

    Like

  16. uehobbyist says:

    ha ha ha! Great ending. At first I thought you were just re-telling old Alice, but then brought it all the way home in the end. Very Nice

    Like

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